Faq. Preguntas frecuentes generales

Adjectives: plausible / implausible

From the very bowels of English, doubts arise from time to time about the use of words, and parts of the sentence, which lead the student to misunderstand. We must be attentive and that is why from this article we want to address the plausible and implausible adjectives that lend themselves to confusion for the beginner and sometimes the initiated.

The use of the adjectives "plausible" and "implausible or implausible".

We use them when we want to talk about something that a person says is probably believed or not. We can also use them when we try to find out if something is true or not. Finally, they can be used to talk about the credibility of a story in a novel, movie, or television show. Here are some example sentences using them.

I was late for work because I overslept, but I can't tell my boss that. I have to think of a plausible excuse for being late.

I can't tell my boss that I was mugged on my way to work. This is a safe city, so that would be totally implausible.

Some people don't think it's plausible that a meteor hitting the earth could cause the dinosaurs to die, but I think it's totally plausible.

Some people think it's implausible that a meteor hitting the earth could cause the dinosaurs to die, but I don't agree.

I like action movies even though most of the time the stories are not plausible at all.

I like action movies even though most of the time the stories are completely implausible.

Positive and negative utilization

From the examples given, it can be easily verified that the adjective "plausible" refers to a positive event, that is, it is used positively, while the adjective "implausible" is a rejection that is used in a negative tone, for which they state as opposites each. The only difference between "implausible" and "implausible" is that "implausible" is a bit more formal than the other.

You should bear in mind that it is not customary to use words like very "very" or really "really" to emphasize these adjectives. Instead, it is more common to use words like "totally" and "completely" to enhance them.

Synthesis

As a summary we can say that as adjectives, the difference between plausible and implausible is that plausible is apparent or apparently valid, probable or acceptable; credible: a plausible excuse while implausible is not plausible; unlikely; doubtful:

Implausible

difficult to believe; not likely:

The plot of the movie, involving a 23-year-old brain surgeon, is implausible to begin with.

Plausible

seeming likely to be true, or able to be believed:

a plausible explanation / excuse

Disapproving

A plausible person appears to be honest and telling the truth, even if they are not: to plausible salesman